ClojureD conference in Berlin

In the end of February five Siilis took off from Helsinki to visit Berlin. ClojureD conference to be exact. Two tracks, plenty of talks and focus in Clojure. This is an overview from the talks that we visited and because Joy Clark had awesome notes on talks too I asked permission to share her notes here as well. Big thumbs up for the visual content!

Teaching Clojure

For me the first talk of the day was about teaching. We have ran our junior program with Clojure for two years as we speak so new views and how others find teaching in this domain was interesting. Mike Sperber shared his point on systematic thinking and how it affects the way we build software.

teaching_clj

Recap in drawing from Joy Clark

Maria: a beginner-friendly coding environment for Clojure

Next talk was about Maria by Dave Liepmann. A simple really beginner friendly place to learn fundamentals in Clojure. In his talk there was quite a few demos on how fast one can get on with coding.

Fast results are important when you start something new and Maria offers fast response to your coding and shows results immediately. Of course when you start doing bigger and more advanced stuff your pace of getting things done and ready will be different.

mariacloud.jpg

Recap in drawing from Joy Clark

 Writing test that suck less

Last talk before lunch was about testing by Torsten Mangner. This talk dived a little deeper to the fundamentals of testing. Talk began wit a confession and gave us the baseline.

“Writing unit tests in Clojure is easy, since testing pure functions is trivial. But the more high-level our tests become, the more they have to deal with the state and side-effects of your application. It becomes harder and harder to write proper tests. And worst of all: they are harder and harder to understand and to maintain, greatly diminishing the value of those tests as a documentation of your software.”

confession.jpg

A Dynamic, Statically Typed Contradiction

After lunch we had the pleasure of diving into mathematics. As Andrew Mcveigh talked about lambda calculus and its application in a “Hindley-Milner“ based type system and how it can be mapped onto Clojure. This solution can also be used to “type-chec” a subset of Clojure code.

Unfortunately my attention was to fully hang on with the maths and our ways with Joy had departed so, no good pictures from this talk. Sorry!

Onyx, virtual machines, jokes and afterparty

Next up for me was Vijay talking about Onyx and its uses for data crunching. An overall look for the uses. Masterless systems, stream and batch processing, flow control and principles of Clojure.

After coffee we got the pleasure of seeing a walkthrough how to implement Clojure on a new virtual machine. Heavy stuff and a great idea.

Last official talk before the lightning talks (I had to skip those because I was hungry and needed a Döner 😉 ) was called defjoke. Live coding a fully compliant spec for humour.

All talks were taped and are available soon in http://clojured.de/ check it out. Other great photos and one-liners can be found in https://twitter.com/clojuredconf

Thanks from Siili to great organisers and speakers. Hoping to see you soon in other adventures!

 

-e

 

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