Cigars and Serverless IoT

Say what? Cigars and Serverless? What on earth could those two have in common? Maybe not much but bare with me and I’ll let you know.

The background

Some time ago I happened to run into a new Finnish open-source sensor beacon platform. I really wanted to give it a try. What could I do with it? Enter cigars! I came up with a requirement and created a user story that I wanted to implement: “As a cigar owner I want to be able to monitor the temperature and humidity of my humidor regardless of my location so that I know when to add purified water into the humidifier“. My current solution required me to open the humidor and check the meter inside it.

Screen Shot 2017-10-17 at 10.04.16

The brainstorm

Two important non-functional requirements were wireless communication from the humidor so I wouldn’t have to do any physical modifications to the humidor and a long battery life so I wouldn’t have to replace it too often. Both were met by the chosen sensor.

So what else would I need to make it happen? A place where I could process and save the sensor data and visualize it for devices regardless of their (or my) location. Enter cloud! I also had a couple of Raspberry Pi boards lying around so when the sensors arrived I was good to go.

AWS has an IoT service that can listen to messages from things (as in Internet of Things) you have registered to it. You can then do whatever you wish with those messages: save them into DynamoDB, process them with Lambda, forward them to Kinesis etc. Just what I needed. Enter serverless! Have to say I was very exited. I had never done any IoT stuff before so this was going to be a learning experience for me as well.

The solution

First thing I wanted to do was to read the sensor from the RasPi. A little bit of web surfing revealed a small but enthusiastic community around the sensor and I found a python script doing exactly what I wanted. The communication technology would be BLE.

Next thing was to connect the RasPi to AWS IoT service. That was also a no-brainer thanks to AWS documentation. AWS creates certificates and keys for the thing to be authenticated with and an endpoint for the messages. AWS processes the incoming messages with Rules. A rule defines a query that parses the incoming message and action(s) to be performed. The thing publishes it’s messages into a named MQTT topic via the given endpoint and the rule is a subscriber to the same topic.

I chose to save the data into DynamoDB by my IoT rule and implement a serveless website using S3 and Lambda. S3 is an object storage that is perfect for hosting static html files and Lambda is a compute service to run code without having to worry about any infrastructure. My Lambda function fetches the data from DynamoDB table and is called by ajax from html through API gateway.

Finally I wanted the lightest and the simpliest javascript graph library to visualize the sensor data from my humidor. See the screenshot  above. A bit boring graph I know. But luckily it is not an EKG!

At the time of writing this the data is flowing once every 15 minutes from the sensor into DynamoDB and it is read from there by Lambda whenever the html page is loaded. Maybe I’ll implement some alarms next?

Screen Shot 2017-10-17 at 8.27.36

What did I learn?

First of all I learned once again that serverless services are extremely fast and easy to implement for example for prototyping. They enable individuals and businesses to do things that have been impossible or at least expensive in the past. They also make it easy to explore new ways of doing thing and doing business. My rough cost estimation for this solution is 1-2€ per month after the AWS free tier has been eaten. So it is fast, easy and cheap as well.

Secondly I learned a lot about how DynamoDB works. There was quite a few tricks on the way. For example is allows you to set a TTL attribute for a field containing epoch seconds as a string but it won’t do anything.

Resources:
AWS Services: IoT, Lambda, S3, DynamoDB
Sensor: Ruuvitag
Hardware: Raspberry Pi
Source and more details: Github

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s